Study the effects of Nipah Virus – A Review

  • Dhiraj Kumar Singh
  • Rakhi Ahuja
  • Nagendra Kumar Singh

Abstract

The effect of Nipah Virus Infection is increasing day by day in today’s scenario and more number of cases are found in various countries. In India it was discovered in Sikkim, Siliguri and West Bengal. It is near borders with China, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sikkim. The primary pathways of transmission is from bats to people, in Bangladesh its transformed via contamination of raw date palm sap by bats with subsequent consumption by humans and through infection of domestic animals (cattle, pigs, and goats), presumably from consumption of food contaminated with bat saliva or urine with subsequent transmission to people. It is found in both species of humans as well as animals more numbers of deaths were found in the both spices, hence zoonotic.


Laboratory investigations at the time of the outbreak did not show or identify an infectious agent. Approximately half of recognized Nipah cases in Bangladesh developed their disease following person to person transmission of the virus. Efforts to prevent transmission should focus on decreasing bat access to date palm sap and reducing family members' and friends' exposure to infected patients' saliva or body fluids.

Keywords: Nipah virus (NiV), Pteropus, Nipah Virus encephalitis, inoculation

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